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or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of the history of the relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the first sent the troops into the soviet union as part of a broad counterrevolutionary force led by the british and then the united states refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer se
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. i think that's important a factor in that if you look at the broad history of the united states relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the united states first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states to refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise mat
union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, w
in addition to the new york civil liberties union that has done some important litigation are of these issues and advocacy? list website? >> guest: www.thebullyproject. com. and we have done a lot of work since the film cannot even before the film cannot to build a broad partnership said coalitions that have enabled us to launch several different programs to provide by aides that go along with the film and that provide opportunities to get involved with the film and the social action campaign. >> host: people can get the book online. door website again is -- >> guest: www.thebullyproject. com and is available on amazon. >> host: that's great. amazon or www.thebullyproject.com. so, this has been quite interesting and i want to congratulate you and thank you on behalf of all parents and kids for the contribution you have made to the wellbeing of all of america's children. >> guest: thank you. >> that was "after words," book tv signature program and which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their materi
union donna lieberman. this week cynthia lowen and her book bully. in that ms. lowen goes beyond the documentary film and presents personal stories and essays from antibullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. a
behind a war effort. maybe only a third of northern want to fight a war to keep the south in union. about a third are happy about it. we get rid of them. they are fine. let's get rid of the south. we don't have to -- let them go. about a third don't care. we don't want them to leave we don't want to fight for it either. lincoln does something clever. some people want to spend armed expedition to reinforce sumter. some want to sneak these troops in to reinforce them. and they want to give it up. lincoln doesn't do any of them. lincoln announces publicly that he's going send an e petition it's only going to have food and no weapons or ammunition. just food. he's forcing the decision to the hands of south carolina radicals. nay let the first expedition through. they can't stop the second. that will probably have soldiers. if they don't let it through they are fired on unarmed convoy. they fire and start the war. but when somebody fires on the flag. all the concerns about how to let them go, they are tossed to the wayside. think about the united states after september 11th or pearl harbor. no
union donald leiber match. in it, cynthia lowen who presents personal stories and essays from anti-bullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s. >> host: i'm so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely-acclaimed and really important new documentary "bully" and the co-editor of the book by the same title. both of which out our nation's dirty little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids on both sides and on the sidelines and their families. so thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. >> guest: thank you, donna. >> host: why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? why bully? why you, why now? >> guest: well, i come from a background as a writer, and when i was in middle school, i was one of the kids who was really shy, um, i i think i tried to sail under the radar, and i was someone who i saw bullying taking place around me, and i d
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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